Cohort 2: 2010-2011

The second cohort of the CCCC fellowships was awarded to sixteen fellows. This cohort included nine graduate students, three faculty members, and four conservation practitioners. Among this group of fellows were two interns who assisted in projects. These fellows also represented six departments and two colleges from CSU, as well as three NGOs.

This cohort focused on problems as diverse as:
  • Scarce water resources sharing among agricultural and urban communities
  • Conservation of the endangered Mongolian wild ass
  • Transboundary stakeholders in ecosystem services projects
  • Collaborative functionality and effectiveness through incentives
This third cohort focused their work in eleven countries that included:
  • Mongolia
  • Kenya
  • Guinea Bissau
  • Peru
  • Costa Rica
  • Panama
  • Nepal
  • Spain
  • Ethiopia
  • Tanzania
  • United States
    • Colorado and Montana
    • Over 30 Tribal Nations

Learn more about each fellow by clicking on their tab

Angie Fuhrmann

About Angie

Angie received her Master´s in the International Development Studies program in the Department of Anthropology at CSU.

Angie Fuhrmann in a cave

Project Summary

Angie worked with five Shipibo indigenous communities in the central Peruvian Amazon and the nonprofit Village Earth to hold a collaborative capacity-building workshop to raise awareness about indigenous territorial issues in the district, introduce the different stakeholders to one another, and to teach community representatives GPS and compass technology so they have the technical capacity to carry out their own territorial demarcation. This was a collaborative step in decreasing illegal deforestation of the region and mitigating conflicts with illegal colonists that threaten both the environment and Shipibo culture.

Carl Reeder

About Carl

Carl was a Peace Corps Masters International student studying geographic information systems (GIS) and forest science in the Department of Forest, Rangeland and Watershed Stewardship at CSU, under the direction of Dr. Melinda Laituri.

Reeder

Project Summary

Through his fellowship, he developed and distribute a GIS training website containing tutorials engineered to improve the conservation capabilities of universities and land management institutions in Ethiopia while serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer.

Location

Ethiopia

Deliverables

Faith Sternlieb

About Faith

Faith was a PhD student in the Department of Geosciences at CSU working with Dr. Melinda Laituri.

faith sternlib

Project Summary

Her fellowship identified and map geospatial attributes that characterize institutional boundaries at different scales for the provision of water resources for livelihoods, livestock, and wildlife. The aim was to demonstrate innovative ways that will encourage collaborative governance in the Mara River Basin, a trans-boundary watershed in Kenya and Tanzania. As part of her fellowship, she traveled to the basin in June of 2010 and met stakeholders, identified communities and study sites, and consolidated relationships with partners.

Location

Mara River Basin, Kenya

Deliverables

Gabriela Bucini

About Gabriela

Gabriela received her PhD in the Graduate Degree Program in Ecology at CSU, working with Dr. Niall Hanan.

Gabriela Bucini

Project Summary

During her CCC fellowship, Gabriela transfered her knowledge in remote-sensing and GIS to local communities in Guinea Bissau, acquired the collaborative conservation skills necessary to support the use of spatial data in the dialogue on conservation and livelihood issues, and build links with Portuguese research scientists and conservation practitioners in Guinea Bissau that will develop into actions to conserve a national park in harmony with the livelihood needs of local inhabitants.

Location

Guinea Bissau

Deliverables

Gregory Pierce

About Gregory

Gregory received his Master’s in the International Development Studies program in the Department of Anthropology at CSU, working with Dr. Jeff Snodgrass.

Pierce

Project Summary

His fellowship explored how ethnically Tibetan agro-pastoralists in the Tarap Valley of Dolpo, Nepal cognitively model the interconnections between their subsistence livelihoods and the hydrological regimes of the glaciers in the Kanjiroba Range and how those models are being adapted to changes resulting from increased warming in the Himalayas.

Location

Tibet, China

Heidi Huber-Stearns

About Heidi

Heidi received her Master of Science degree from the Department of Human Dimensions of Natural Resources at CSU, working with Drs. Joshua Goldstein and Stu Cottrell.

Heidi Huber-Sterns

Project Summary

For her fellowship, she explored the potential roles of intermediaries in Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) in the context of Chiriquí province in western Panama where stakeholders are actively exploring the development of a regional PES program. Home to La Amistad National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage designated biosphere reserve, Chiriquí province is a biologically diverse and agriculturally important region of Panama facing mounting pressure from myriad environmental, economic and livelihood concerns.

Heidi’s work builds directly upon an earlier study by CCC Fellow Esther Duke that explored the potential involvement of landowners as ecosystem service sellers into a future PES scheme in the study region.

Heidi conducted interviews with representatives of 34 intermediary organizations in the region to gain an understanding of their organization’s current intermediary roles and potential roles in a future PES program, their relative strengths and limitations in terms of organizational capacity, and how their organizations are connected to each other through networking and collaborations.

To learn more about Hedi’s work please follow the link to here report in, Ecosystem ServicesVolume 6, December 2013, Pages 104–116, Payments for Ecosystem Services and Their Institutional Dimensions: Analyzing the Diversity of Existing PES Approaches in Developing and Industrialized Countries.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S221204161300079X

Jason Ransom

About Jason

Jason received his PhD from the Graduate Degree Program in Ecology at CSU, working with Dr. Tom Hobbs.

Jason Ransom

Project Summary

Through his fellowship, Jason developed a novel ground-based population estimation method that integrates local communities into conservation initiatives for threatened and endangered ungulates in Mongolia. He helped build a sustainable network of Mongolian pastoralists who can contribute to population estimates and long-term monitoring of khulan and gazelle in the Great Gobi B Strictly Protected Area (SPA).

Kathie Mattor

About Kathie

Kathie Mattor completed her doctorate under Dr. Tony Cheng in the Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship at CSU in 2013.

Kathie Mattor

Project Summary

Her CCC fellowship provided an opportunity to conduct interviews throughout the intermountain west for her dissertation research. During her fellowship, she worked with agency and community practitioners to develop an improved understanding of the factors influencing the levels of collaboration associated with stewardship contracts on U.S. national forests, as well as identifying the outcomes associated with this relatively new management option.

Location

Colorado, USA

R. Patrick Bixler

About Patrick

Patrick received his PhD from the Department of Sociology, CSU, working with Dr. Pete Taylor.

R Patrick Bixler

Project Summary

Through a fellowship partnership with the Blackfoot Challenge, a rancher-led collaborative initiative in Montana, Patrick collaboratively explored the problem of transferability and scaling up of the Blackfoot Challenge experience. Specifically, he asked: How does a community-based stewardship organization balance the desire to be place-based with the responsibilities of sharing the collaborative conservation message?

Brett Bruyere

About Brett

Brett is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Dimensions of Natural Resources at CSU.

Brett Bruyere

Project Summary

His fellowship includes a combination of research and outreach/education in environmental science and communication in the Samburu region of Kenya. Specifically, he is collaborating with organizations engaged in similar work in other parts of Kenya to share best practices and lessons learned; integrate youth in citizen science to participate in monitoring of local conditions; include the involvement of faculty and/or students from Kenya Methodist University in conducting this research and outreach; and develop viable educational formats and activities to engage local youth and their communities in conservation.

Maria Fernandez-Gimenez

About Maria

Maria is an Associate Professor in the Department of Forest, Rangeland and Watershed Stewardship at CSU.

Maria Fernandez Gimenez

Project Summary

Her fellowship builds on existing collaboration with Mongolian research organizations and NGOs to build the capacity of Mongolian scientists and practitioners for applied interdisciplinary participatory research. It also launches a new collaboration with the Pyrenean Institute of Ecology (Spain) and villagers in four Pyrenean valleys, to study the effects of socio-economic change on pastoral communities and management institutions. Check out Maria’s blog, “La Pastora de Jaca” at http://lapastoradejaca.blogspot.com/ .

Tony Cheng

About Tony

Tony is an Associate Professor in the Department of Forest, Rangeland and Watershed Stewardship at CSU.

Tony Cheng

Project Summary

The purpose of his fellowship is to develop a systems analysis framework in collaboration with practitioners to examine and improve the interaction between localized collaborative forest stewardship conservation on U.S. public lands and multi-level organizational and policy systems.

Location

Colorado, USA

Deliverables

What is ‘resilience’ and what does it look like for public land ecosystems and rural communities?

Art Goodtimes

About Art

Art is Chair of the San Miguel County, CO Board of Commissioners, chair of the Public Lands Steering Committee of Colorado Counties, Inc. (the state county government organization), a member of the board of the Western Interstate Region of the National Association of Counties (NACo) and also of a member of NACo’s Public Lands Steering Committee and chair of NACo’s Gateway Communities Subcommittee.

Art Goodtimes

Project Summary

The goal of his fellowship was to craft a county-run pilot project that will offer private ranches in the San Miguel River watershed a calculated revenue offset for ecosystem services that they are either currently providing or could provide in the future.

Dieter Erdmann

About Dieter

Dieter is the Director of Conservation Operations for Colorado Open Lands, a statewide non-profit land trust.

Dieter Erdmann

Project Summary

For Dieter’s fellowship, he worked on leveraging private land conservation incentives with municipal investments to promote agricultural water sharing along the Lower South Platte River in Colorado to sustain agricultural communities while meeting the growing water demands of urban areas.

Awards

Dieter Erdman recently accepted an award for his significant contribution in establishing the San Luis Hills State Wildlife Area in Colorado’s San Luis Valley.

Location

Colorado, USA

Deliverables

Hill Grimmett

About Hill

Hill is the Founder and Director of the Northern Colorado Food Incubator and Co-Director of Be Local Northern Colorado.

Hill Grimmett

Project Summary

During this fellowship, Hill developed a marketing action plan for local “conservation beef.” In collaboration with a small number of local producers of grass-fed beef, he explored the opportunities for developing a branded line of beef products to be sold at the proposed Fort Collins Community Marketplace and elsewhere. In addition to his marketing action plan, Hill will produce written plan documents for CCC’s Collaborative Conservation Learning Network.

Location

Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

Deliverables

Lee Scharf

About Lee

Lee is the owner of a Fort Collins business, Mesa LLC, Mediated Environmentally Sustainable Action.

Scharf

Project Summary

Her fellowship  identifed prospective tribal professionals interested in using or leading collaborative efforts to address conservation issues on tribal lands. Identification of interested tribal professionals was done by in-person visits to tribal lands and to organizations engaged in tribal work, as well as by teleconference. A select group of tribal professionals was asked to design a training to develop their practice expertise from tribal nation to tribal nation and with multiple stakeholders, through an online dialogue created by a CSU Native American student. Lee has contributed an article/report for the collaborative conservation learning network that describes the process and outcomes of her project.